BEIJING

Cheng Ran
"Diary of a Madman"

September 9 - October 22, 2017
Opening: Saturday, September 9, 2017; 4 - 6.30pm


Cheng Ran

The Self-Portrait (Diary of a Madman - New York), 2016
single channel HD video, color/sound, 16:9
5'34''
edition of 6 + 1 AP 

 

 

Cheng Ran
Diary of a Madman


2017 (english)

Galerie Urs Meile is pleased to announce the opening of Diary of a Madman, the latest exhibition by Cheng Ran (b. 1981 in Inner Mongolia, China). This exhibition can be seen as Cheng’s latest cinematic experiment in his quest to understand the essence of language & speech, Otherness, aspects of Psychogeography, and the relationship between time and the urban environment.

As part of a new generation of young Chinese artists, Cheng Ran and his peers face the challenge of defining and developing their individual artistic autonomy in an increasingly monopolized global environment. Perhaps this is why his generation is particularly interested in themes such as boundaries, differences, resistance and marginalization. As the artist has said, “When a boundary becomes blurred and opens up something new, that is what I look for in my work.” His artistic practice has followed this motto since.

Diary of a Madman
is an ongoing project which began in 2016. It currently consists of three parts, each filmed in a different location, that have gradually come together to form the artist’s own “urban cantos.” The first part, Diary of a Madman - New York, was completed during a three-month residency in New York in 2016. This was followed by another residency Cheng undertook in Jerusalem in the same year—Diary of a Madman - Jerusalem is still a work-in-progress. In Hong Kong, the artist filmed and completed Diary of a Madman - Hong Kong in 2017, turning the existing project into a visual trilogy of a phantasmatic journey across three vastly different cultural spheres. The exhibition will showcase the two completed parts of the project, New York and Hong Kong, alongside elements of the Jerusalem segment. Cheng Ran has carefully divided the space and devised a meandering exhibition path to present the three segments of the main work, New York, Hong Kong and Jerusalem. In addition, the television painting DD-MM-YYYY serves as a preface, while a large wall mural of production photographs titled The Ear Bums, and several pieces of installation works bring the viewer through the pages of Cheng Ran’s diary in a powerful visual experience.

The title is a reference to the short story Diary of a Madman by Chinese writer Lu Xun (b. Zhejiang, China, 1881–1936). In a departure from Lu Xun’s story, Cheng is less interested in an explicit political message. By using complex cinematography expressed through his idiosyncratic ideas on memories, living space and language, his story conveys a mysteriously poetic sensation—one which lingers between the streets of Manhattan and the remnants of their shadows inside a disturbed mind that hums along to a strange tune… A profound sense of loss, alienation and madness run in the first person throughout the course of the New York segment. In the Hong Kong segment, the artist turned his focus to a Hong Kong without the shiny façade and myriad shopping complexes through the eyes of ‘Ma Ying’ (the Asian black kite, a common bird in the skies over Hong Kong) and ‘Tang Gou’ (a stray dog), two symbols of the city, poetically conveying the destinies of the city’s residents and their subtle, inextricable links to the true environment of this city. DD-MM-YYYY uses discordant forms, combining video, a television set and its mountings, graffitti, neon tubes and other readymade objects to convey a moment in a city’s history. In these two parts (New York and Hong Kong), Cheng freely deconstructs meaning and speech in their original setting by reversing the roles, thus presenting a complex lingual situation that resists ready definition. This situation seems unfathomable and absurd, but it is in such circumstances that we are forced to look at the nature of language and speech from a fresh viewpoint. And this is exactly what the artist would like us to understand in his work: through all the dilemmas and contradictions, within imagery fused with the demolition and reconstruction of words, Cheng opens up a profound space for contemplation of ‘otherness.’

(The above text includes excerpts from Guo Xiaohui’s essay Cheng Ran’s New Work: Diary of a Madman written for this exhibition.)

Cheng Ran was born in 1981 in Inner Mongolia, China and currently lives and works in Hangzhou. This exhibition marks his eighth solo exhibition at Galerie Urs Meile. The artist’s most recent solo shows include: Cheng Ran: Selected Films, Galerie Urs Meile, Lucerne, Switzerland (2017); Diary of a Madman, New Museum, New York, USA (2016); In Course of the Miraculous, K11 Art Foundation, Hong Kong, China (2016); and Orange Blue, Qiao Space, Shanghai, China (2016). Recent group exhibitions include: Sparkle! When will I See You Again, Oil Street Art Space, Hong Kong, China (2017); Constellation–Contemporary Art in Today’s China, The National Gallery of Georgia, Tbilissi, Georgia, and Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago, USA (screening, 2017); A Beautiful Disorder, The Cass Sculpture Foundation, West Sussex, UK (2016); Turning Point: Contemporary Art in China Since 2000, Shanghai Minsheng Art Museum, Shanghai, China (2016); Unlimited, Art Basel, Messe Basel, Messeplatz, Basel, Switzerland (2016); SALTWATER: a Theory of Thought Forms, 14th Istanbul Biennial, Istanbul, Turkey (2015); and Inside China, Palais de Tokyo, Paris, France (2014) which then toured to K11 Art Foundation in Hong Kong in 2015. In addition, Cheng Ran’s solo show Cheng Ran–In Course of the Miraculous in Belfast, Northern Ireland and group show Shanghai Urban Space Art Season 2017 will be launched this October. He will also be holding a solo show at The Centre for Contemporary Art, Tel Aviv in 2018, and will take part in FRONT International: Cleveland Triennial for Contemporary Art.

 

 

LUCERNE

Aldo Walker

September 2 - October 28, 2017
Opening: Saturday, September 2, 2017; 12 - 7pm
Within "Kunsthoch" - 22 exhibitions of contemporary art in and around Lucerne, a joint actionday
Opening Reception: Saturday, September 2, 2017; 5 - 7pm


 

Aldo Walker

Ohne Titel (Ausflug), 1984
disperson paint on canvas
164.5 x 174.5 cm

 


Aldo Walker


2017 (english)

Working closely with the family of Aldo Walker (* November 6, 1938, in Winterthur; † March 17, 2000, in Lucerne, Switzerland), Galerie Urs Meile is overseeing the care of the artist’s estate. To mark this occasion, we are showing a selection of Walker’s works from the 1980s in our Lucerne gallery.

Until his early death in 2000, the conceptual artist Aldo Walker was a great influence on both the local and national art scenes in Switzerland in the 1980s and 1990s. After training as an electrician, Walker took over his father’s business in 1964 and ran it as a one-man operation until 1979. He began producing his conceptual works of art in the 1960s. After finishing his regular workday, he would go home to the apartment he shared with his wife, Mathilde, and their two daughters, and spend his evenings making art and studying the philosophical theories of the day. Aldo Walker took his second job as an artist seriously, and in 1960 he exhibited for the first time in public, in the Annual Exhibition at the Institute of Contemporary Art (ICA) in London. This was followed by more group shows in Switzerland and abroad. Worth special mention was his participation in Harald Szeemann’s now-legendary show, When Attitudes become Form at the Kunsthalle Bern in 1969, as well as in the 1986 Venice Biennial, where Walker represented Switzerland in company with John Armleder. After completing a residency in New York in 1984-5, the autodidact artist and philosopher took up a position in the department of Visual Design at the Höhere Schule für Gestaltung Zürich, where he taught until 1998 with the passionate conviction that art must always reach its audience.


The exhibition at the Galerie Urs Meile focuses on the paintings Walker called Piktogramme (Pictograms), which he began working on in the 1980s. Putting pencil to paper, he practiced first, making meticulous drawings. Later, with confident brushstrokes, Walker would paint the lines of his pictograms directly onto monochromatic backgrounds, most of them white on black, or vice-versa. The brushstrokes render visible previously unseen constellations of human and animal outlines. They are not necessarily depicted in familiar frontal views or cross-sections, but instead are twisted, intertwined, dissected, and reassembled. It is the knowledge of perspective that first makes it possible to perceive them in two dimensions. The visible bodies are reducted; most are nude, hairless, sightless, the eyes apparently closed or depicted only as circles without pupils. In reducing the lines, Walker does not aim for a style that aestheticizes, but rather, one that makes it possible to see visual experiments. Supposedly familiar motifs can suddenly tip over an edge to become something else; in observing them, the spontaneous switch from one certainty to another clarifies how our perception functions.


Walker conceived of his works as controlled experiments that would answer questions and test theories. Through his figurative images he experimented with how content is generated and interpreted via observation—although he is not at all concerned with the content itself, just as he is not concerned with the notion of art as an intrinsic, self-referential system, or with the idea of the artist as a genius. Despite his austere concept of art, Walker’s parodying, self-ironic attitude toward the environment he lived in resulted in titles such as Education Suisse (Herr Ober, wir verändern die Welt) (Swiss Education [Waiter! We are going to change the world], 1982) or Ohne Titel (Standbein-Spielbein) (Untitled [Support Leg-Free Leg], 1985–1986). Sometimes his figures smoke or pee; next to the nudes stand folkloric characters like the yodeler and the monk; the common man’s Sunday dinner—chicken—joins the farm animals and others that every child has seen at the zoo.


Preceding the Piktogramme in Walker’s oeuvre were installations and performances, consequential ways of continuing to examine the issues that concerned him as a conceptual artist. Walker made text-images and wrote theoretical texts; besides his paintings, his largest group of works is the Logotypen, object-like things of mechanical precision and absurd function. His legendary exhibition Lettre d’images par Aldo Walker at the Helmhaus in Zurich in 1989, and its accompanying catalogue, form an overall work of art, whose theme was the operational system of art, which he investigated by exhibiting many works of art—none of them his. Mentally incorruptible, Walker tested concepts without withdrawing into dryness. His works are also never decorative or narcissistic, but in their absurd intimacy and ridiculous freshness they continue to inspire.


Aldo Walker (* November 6, 1938, in Winterthur; † March 17, 2000, Lucerne), 1984/85: residency at the Institute for Art and Urban Resources in New York. 1987 on: Teacher at the Höhere Schule für Gestaltung Zürich; department head from 1991 to 1998. Selected group shows: Annual Exhibition at the Institute of Contemporary Art (ICA), London (1960); Operationen: Realisation von Ideen, Programmen und Konzeptionen in Raum, Environment, Objekt, Licht, Film, Kinetik, Bild, Ton, Spielkarten at the Museum Fridericianum Kassel (1969); When Attitudes become Form, Kunsthalle Bern and Museum Haus Lange Krefeld (1969), curated by Harald Szeemann; Visualisierte Denkprozesse, Kunstmuseum Luzern (1970), curated by Jean-Christophe Ammann; Pläne und Projekte, Kunsthalle Bern, Kunstraum München and Kunsthaus Hamburg (1970); A Head Museum, Archiva Museet Lund and Moderna Museet Stockholm (1974); The Seventies, CAYC Buenos Aires, Museu de Arte Moderna Sao Paolo and Universita de Mexico City (1976); Schweizer Kunst ‘70–’80, Kunstmuseum Luzern, Galleria civila Bologna, Palazzo Biancho Genova, Landesmuseum Bonn, Landesmuseum am Johanneum Graz (1981); In Residence, PSI, New York (1984); Prospekt 86, Kunsthalle, Frankfurt am Main (1986); Vater und Sohn: Roesch und Walker und Winnewisser, Kulturpanorama am Löwenplatz, Lucerne (1988); Transit: New Art from Switzerland, The National Museum of Contemporary Art, Oslo (1993); HugoSuter–Aldo Walker–Rolf Winnewisser, Helmhaus Zürich (1999); Heute ist morgen: Über die Zukunft von Erfahrung und Konstruktion, Kunst- und Ausstellungshalle der Bundesrepublik Deutschland, Bonn (2000); Beyond Borders: Kunst zu Grenzsituationen, Conix Museum, Zurich (2000); Prospekt! Zu einer Sammlung für Gegenwartskunst, Aargauer Kunsthaus Aarau (2001); Die Möglichkeit nicht mehr haben, sich weniger ähnlich zu sein: Yves Netzhammer – 2 Animationen & 1 Bild von Aldo Walker, Erfrischungsraum, Galerie der HGK Luzern (2004). Selected solo shows: Galerie Toni Gerber, Berne (1971); Galerie Raeber, Lucerne (1971); Beryll Cristallo, Kunstmuseum Luzern (1975); Galerie Stähli, Zurich (1976); Kunstmuseum Luzern (1977); Stromern im Bild, Mannheimer Kunstverein (1982); Biennale Venedig, Swiss Pavilion (with John Armleder) (1986); Arbeiten seit 1964, Aargauer Kunsthaus Aarau (1986); Kunsthalle Basel (1987); Lettre d’images par Aldo Walker, Helmhaus Zürich (1989); Früher oder später, Kunstmuseum Luzern (1989); Kunst überfordern. Aldo Walker (1938 – 2000): Retrospektive, Kunsthaus Luzern (2006).

 


 


2017 (deutsch)


Die Galerie Urs Meile übernimmt in enger Zusammenarbeit mit der Familie Walker die Betreuung des Nachlasses des Künstlers Aldo Walker (* 6.11.1938 Winterthur, † 17.3.2000 Luzern). Aus diesem Anlass zeigen wir in unseren Luzerner Ausstellungsräumen eine Auswahl von Walkers Arbeiten aus den 1980er Jahren.

Der Konzeptkünstler Aldo Walker war in den 1980er und 1990er Jahren bis zu seinem frühen Tod im Jahr 2000 prägend für die lokale innerschweizerische sowie die nationale Kunstszene. Nach seiner Ausbildung zum Elektroinstallateur übernahm Walker 1964 den väterlichen Betrieb und führte ihn bis 1979 als Einmannbetrieb. Seine ersten konzeptuellen Werke entstanden bereits in den 1960er Jahren nach Arbeitsschluss in der Mietwohnung, in der er mit seiner Frau Mathilde und zwei Töchtern lebte, und wo er sich nachts in aktuelle philosophische Theorien vertiefte. Konsequent verfolgte Aldo Walker seine nebenberufliche Tätigkeit als Künstler und trat 1960 mit der Annual Exhibition im Institute of Contemporary Art (ICA) in London erstmals öffentlich in Erscheinung. Es folgen Ausstellungsteilnahmen im In- und Ausland. Besonders hervorzuheben sind die Beteiligung an Harald Szeemanns inzwischen legendärer Ausstellung When attitudes become form (Kunsthalle Bern, 1969) sowie die Teilnahme an der Biennale in Venedig 1986, wo Aldo Walker zusammen mit John Armleder die Schweiz repräsentierte. Nach einem Stipendienaufenthalt in New York 1984/85 trat der künstlerische und philosophische Autodidakt 1987 seine Stelle als Dozent an der Zürcher Schule für Gestaltung im Fachbereich Visuelle Gestaltung an, wo er bis 1998 leidenschaftlich mit dem sozialen Anliegen unterrichtete, dass Kunst stets ihr Publikum erreichen müsse.

Die Ausstellung in der Galerie Urs Meile fokussiert auf die seit den 1980er Jahren entstandenen, von Aldo Walker als Piktogramme bezeichneten Werke: Nach sorgfältiger zeichnerischer Einübung mit Stiften auf Papier malte Walker die Linien seiner Piktogramme direkt mit sicher geführtem Pinsel auf die einfarbigen Hintergründe, zumeist weiss auf schwarz oder umgekehrt. Zu erkennen sind in diesen Pinselstrichen bislang ungesehene Konstellationen von Umrisslinien menschlicher und tierischer Körperteile. Sie sind dabei nicht unbedingt in ihrer als typisch bekannten frontalen oder seitlichen Ansicht abgebildet, sondern verdreht, ineinander verschlungen, zerlegt und neu zusammengesetzt. Erst das Wissen um Perspektive macht sie in der zweidimensionalen Ansicht lesbar. Die sichtbaren Körper sind reduziert, meist nackt, haarlos, ohne Blick, mit nur angedeuteten geschlossenen Augen oder pupillenlosen Kreisen. Durch die Reduzierung der Linien erzielt Walker keine ästhetisierende Stilisierung, sondern ermöglicht visuelle Experimente. Vermeintlich erkannte Motive können wie Kippfiguren in andere umschlagen, der spontane Wechsel von einer Gewissheit zu einer anderen verdeutlicht beim Betrachten, wie unsere Wahrnehmung funktioniert.

Walker versteht seine Werke als Kontrollinstanzen für Fragestellungen und Theorien. Mit seinen figürlichen Bildern testet er, wie Inhalte generiert und beim Betrachten interpretiert werden – um den Inhalt selbst geht es ihm dabei allerdings nicht. Ebenso wenig, wie es ihm um Kunst als intrinsisches, nur auf sich selbst verweisendes System geht oder um den Künstler als Genie. Trotz aller Strenge seines Kunstbegriffs blitzt Walkers parodistische und selbstironische Haltung gegenüber seinem Lebensumfeld in Motiven und in Titeln wie Education Suisse (Herr Ober, wir verändern die Welt) (1982) oder Ohne Titel (Standbein-Spielbein (1985–1986) auf. Seine Gestalten rauchen oder pinkeln auch mal, neben den Unbekleideten stehen volkstümliche Gestalten wie Jodler und Mönche, zu den Bauernhoftieren und solchen, die jedes Kind aus dem Zoo kennt, gesellen sich Poulets, die Sonntagsbraten des kleinen Mannes.

Innerhalb von Walkers OEuvre sind den Piktogrammen - welche eine konsequente Weiterführung seiner Anliegen als Konzeptkünstler sind - installative und performative Werke vorausgegangen. Walker hat Textbilder geschaffen, theoretische Texte verfasst, und seine, neben den Bildern grösste Werkgruppe der Logotypen geschaffen, objektartige Gegenstände von mechanischer Präzision und absurder Funktionalität. Seine legendäre Ausstellung Lettre d’images par Aldo Walker im Zürcher Helmhaus im Jahr 1989 und der dazugehörige Katalog bildeten ein Gesamtkunstwerk, in dem Walker das Betriebssystem Kunst thematisierte, indem er dort zwar vieles, doch keine selbstproduzierten Werke ausstellte. Gedanklich unkorrumpierbar testet Walker Konzepte, ohne in hermetische Trockenheit abzuheben. Auch sind seine Werke nie dekorativ oder selbstverliebt, sondern in ihrer aberwitzigen Innigkeit und absurden Frische weiterhin inspirierend.

Aldo Walker (* 6.11.1938 Winterthur, † 17.3.2000 Luzern), 1984/85 Stipendiat am Institute for Art and Urban Resources in New York. Seit 1987 Lehrauftrag an der Höheren Schule für Gestaltung Zürich, dort von 1991 bis 1998 Studienbereichsleiter. Ausgewählte Gruppenausstellungen: Annual Exhibition am Institute of Contemporary Art (ICA), London (1960); Operationen: Realisation von Ideen, Programmen und Konzeptionen in Raum, Environment, Objekt, Licht, Film, Kinetik, Bild, Ton, Spielkarten im Museum Fridericianum Kassel (1969); When attitudes become form, Kunsthalle Bern und Museum Haus Lange Krefeld (1969), kuratiert von Harald Szeemann; Visualisierte Denkprozesse, Kunstmuseum Luzern (1970), kuratiert von Jean-Christophe Ammann; Pläne und Projekte, Kunsthalle Bern, Kunstraum München und Kunsthaus Hamburg (1970); A Head Museum, Archiva Museet Lund und Moderna Museet Stockholm (1974); The Seventies, CAYC Buenos Aires, Museu de Arte Moderna Sao Paolo und Universita de Mexico City (1976); Schweizer Kunst ‘70–’80, Kunstmuseum Luzern, Galleria civila Bologna, Palazzo Biancho Genova, Landesmuseum Bonn, Landesmuseum am Johanneum Graz (1981); In Residence, PSI, New York (1984); Prospekt 86, Kunsthalle Frankfurt am Main (1986); Vater und Sohn: Roesch und Walker und Winnewisser, Kulturpanorama am Löwenplatz, Luzern (1988); Transit: New Art from Switzerland, The National Museum of Contemporary Art, Oslo (1993); Hugo Suter–Aldo Walker–Rolf Winnewisser, Helmhaus Zürich (1999); Heute ist morgen: Über die Zukunft von Erfahrung und Konstruktion, Kunst- und Ausstellungshalle der Bundesrepublik Deutschland, Bonn (2000); Beyond Borders: Kunst zu Grenzsituationen, Conix Museum, Zürich (2000); Prospekt! Zu einer Sammlung für Gegenwartskunst, Aargauer Kunsthaus Aarau (2001); Die Möglichkeit nicht mehr haben, sich weniger ähnlich zu sein: Yves Netzhammer – 2 Animationen & 1 Bild von Aldo Walker, Erfrischungsraum, Galerie der HGK Luzern (2004). Ausgewählte Einzelausstellungen: Galerie Toni Gerber, Bern (1971); Galerie Raeber, Luzern (1971); Beryll Cristallo, Kunstmuseum Luzern (1975); Galerie Stähli, Zürich (1976); Kunstmuseum Luzern (1977); Stromern im Bild, Mannheimer Kunstverein (1982); Biennale Venedig, Schweizer Pavillon (mit John Armleder) (1986); Arbeiten seit 1964, Aargauer Kunsthaus Aarau (1986); Kunsthalle Basel (1987); Lettre d’images par Aldo Walker, Helmhaus Zürich (1989); Früher oder später, Kunstmuseum Luzern (1989); Kunst überfordern. Aldo Walker (1938–2000): Retrospektive, Kunsthaus Luzern (2006).